I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World (2020)

I m Chocolate You re Vanilla Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race Conscious World This superb rational and highly readable volume answers a deeply felt need Parents and educators alike have long struggled to understand what meanings race might have for the very young and for way
  • Title: I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World
  • Author: Marguerite A. Wright
  • ISBN: 9780787952341
  • Page: 329
  • Format: Paperback
  • I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World
    This superb, rational, and highly readable volume answers a deeply felt need Parents and educators alike have long struggled to understand what meanings race might have for the very young, and for ways to insure that every child grows up with a healthy sense of self Marguerite Wright handles sensitive issues with consummate clarity, practicality, and hope Here we have aThis superb, rational, and highly readable volume answers a deeply felt need Parents and educators alike have long struggled to understand what meanings race might have for the very young, and for ways to insure that every child grows up with a healthy sense of self Marguerite Wright handles sensitive issues with consummate clarity, practicality, and hope Here we have an indispensable guide that will doubtless prove a classic Edward Zigler, sterling professor of psychology and director, Yale Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy A child s concept of race is quite different from that of an adult Young children perceive skin color as magical even changeable and unlike adults, are incapable of understanding adult predjudices surrounding race and racism Just as children learn to walk and talk, they likewise come to understand race in a series of predictable stages Based on Marguerite A Wright s research and clinical experience, I m Chocolate, You re Vanilla teaches us that the color blindness of early childhood can, and must, be taken advantage of in order to guide the positive development of a child s self esteem Wright answers some fundamental questions about children and race including What do children know and understand about the color of their skin When do children understand the concept of race Are there warning signs that a child is being adversely affected by racial prejudice How can adults avoid instilling in children their own negative perceptions and prejudices What can parents do to prepare their children to overcome the racism they are likely to encounter How can schools lessen the impact of racism With wisdom and compassion, I m Chocolate, You re Vanilla spells out how to educate black and biracial children about race, while preserving their innate resilience and optimism the birthright of all children.
    • BEST KINDLE "☆ I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World" || DOWNLOAD (E-Book) ✓
      329 Marguerite A. Wright
    • thumbnail Title: BEST KINDLE "☆ I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World" || DOWNLOAD (E-Book) ✓
      Posted by:Marguerite A. Wright
      Published :2019-07-06T13:52:30+00:00

    One Reply to “I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World”

    1. I disagreed with most of the author s premises, though she is obviously a competent and thoughtful psychologist who really cares about kids and families After each sentence of this book, I wanted to say Yes, but The book overall lacked a nuanced insight into the ways individual and structural forces combine to produce inequalities and social problems For example, she says that most of the time, if an African American child has low self esteem, it s not because of societal racism, it s because s [...]

    2. As a white person preparing to adopt black children, I m reading all kinds of books about race Interesting, provocative, challenging, enlightening books This isn t really one of those books.Published in 1998, it does feel a tiny bit dated, as some reviewers have mentioned The bigger problems I see are the constant contradictions and confusing thesis Race totally doesn t matter to kids Even when they say it does Except sometimes, when it does And it s not a big deal No different from your shoe si [...]

    3. This book came recommended from many lists of Ethiopian adoption books She starts from the perspective of a young child and how they view the world up through highschool My favorite parts of the book is where the author gives specific recommendations I learned the most about what really young kids know and understand about race She emphasizes repeatedly to allow kids to be kids for as long as possible When they start asking questions is the best time to address various aspects of race I like all [...]

    4. I m way behind on my reviews of books, which makes it difficult to write in detail However my broad impressions were An excellent book on a very important subject how to raise healthy children especially black and biracial, though the principles can be applied to other situations in a racist American society both as parents and as educators Though the book is written in the American context it is broadly applicable as far as it relates to developmental stages and broad principles Her main point [...]

    5. This book discusses how children gradually learn about and come to understand the ideas of color and race, their own membership in a particular racial group, and individual and societal racism, from the preschool years through adolescence It also makes suggestions for how parents and teachers can foster a healthy self concept in children from racial and ethnic minorities and gives ideas for how to respond to racism among children and how to promote positive relationships among children of differ [...]

    6. I am reading this in preparation for adopting an African American into a Caucasian Middle Eastern family The author is very direct and clear in her mission to improve the self image and lives of African American children The book wasn t written specifically for adoptive parents, but I find it helpful I have a background in Education, but this subject was never raised in any of my classes I find fault with the LSU Education Department and Grad school for that because the student populations I wor [...]

    7. I started this book a year ago, then put it down for several months as I got bogged down in it Once I picked it back up again, it moved much quickly Wright is a Black psychologist, so I appreciate her perspective, but the book was also written almost 20 years ago so isn t as current as other works are and what she says doesn t always agree with some of the Black voices I hear It s nice to hear different opinions, however, so I thought it was worth reading.This is not, by the way, a text for whi [...]

    8. As a white parent of a black three year old, the title of this book led me to believe that I was the audience But that seemed to only be true in a peripheral sense, as the author really seemed to be targeting black parents in the interest of breaking some old cultural habits In that sense, I had a small window into many of the obstacles that many maybe most black children face, particularly given the decayed public education system in the U.S The biggest value in the book for me may have been th [...]

    9. This was the first full book I read about children and their view of race I ended up only reading through the first half because once I got to the jr high years and beyond, that just seems so far away I couldn t relate to it at all it had a lot of good insight into the actual thought processes of young children and how adults can often aggravate racial issues on accident I appreciated the author s detailed approach and also her humor I have found a lot recommendations for books on this subject, [...]

    10. There s nothing wrong with this book exactly, but there are others that cover the same material in a compelling and modern way Also, it didn t answer my current question, which is how to better teach racial sensitivity to white kids, since most of the kids I teach are white, and I really want them to grow up not to be jerks I m going to a workshop with Ms Wright soon, and I m really looking forward to hearing any updates she might want to offer.

    11. Bought this b c I thought it was about transracial adoption It is not but it is insightful for understanding how children start to understand and experience race I have this on my parenting book shelf b c it helps me with my son, but it s not really a parenting book The tone is pretty scholarly I recommend for anyone who wants to understand children and their experiences of race better and to understand how to discuss race with children.

    12. This book had some interesting insights that would be helpful for anyone rearing children outside of their own cultral or color background However, I thought much of the author s insights had to do with raising African American children and less with biracial children I think if you were going to raise a biracial child as only black this book would have information for you I am still looking for a book that has advice on raising biracial children.

    13. Excellent book I bought this at the SUNY New Paltz 2002 Multicultural Education Conference, when I was pregnant with my son, on the advice of the late Dr Margaret Wade Lewis, Chair of the Department of Black Studies and Director of the Scholar s Mentorship Program Dr Wade Lewis passed in 2010 I was lucky to speak with her, as well as attend her workshop in 2002.

    14. This is a book that I ll continue to read I ve read the preschool section and as my kids age I ll keep reading with them I think this is a great book for parents raising black children no matter what the parents race is I also think it s a good book for any parent to read no matter what race your child is.

    15. A nice gentle foray into race that would be a good starting point for parents of transracially adopted children I had many aha moments and started looking at some of my own racism benign or positive, it s still racism Wright also gives some excellent tools I finished this book thinking, okay, it ll be a lot of hard work, but I can raise black childrenwith lots of help.

    16. A really helpful book to understand the developmental aspects racial awareness and identity development as well as helpful advice for teaching children about racism and responding in ways that promote positive identity development and are appropriate for different ages.

    17. Loved this book A very important book for anyone raising Black or Biracial children and those who work with them I loved the Marguerite s positive attitude and no nonsense take on the issues Loved it.

    18. I thought this book had a silly title, but after reading the book it seems appropriate This is how a young child would describe their skin color, not yet being conscious of what skin color means to society This book was so refreshing and reminded me how amazing children are.

    19. I m skeptical if this book is still up to date with best practices It felt like it conflicted with a lot of information we ve received elsewhere Also, I think it was written with black parents in mind.

    20. Loved this Anyone who wants to understand race and multi culturual issues better should read this Anyone raising children should read this I learned so much and thought the author was very credible.

    21. This book is one of the most balanced and rational presentations of information on race and young children that I have read It has benefited me not only as a preschool teacher but also as a mother of mixed children.

    22. Great, practical parenting tips, but her assertion that young children don t see race racism keeps this from a 5 star Just hasn t been my experience.

    23. I really enjoyed this book and will pick it up again from time to time as Yabbi grows up Wright explains how children understand race as they grow up Very helpful.

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